Scottish Criminal Appeals

Photo by David von Diemar on Unsplash

In two of my previous blogs (Life should mean Life? published on 22 March 2019 and Commit the crime, do the time? published on 4 March 2019), I discussed the sentencing process in relation to individuals who have been convicted of criminal offences in the Scottish Courts.

In Life should mean life?, I looked at the sentencing of the teenage murderer, Aaron Campbell by Lord Matthews in the High Court of Justiciary in Glasgow. Campbell was convicted of the murder of 6 year old Alesha MacPhail. Lord Matthews imposed a prison sentence of 27 years on Campbell. This is the minimum term which Campbell must serve before he is eligible to apply for parole. It does not mean that he will be released at the end of this term.

We learned today (4 April 2019), that Campbell‘s legal team has lodged a note of appeal against his sentence. He is not appealing against his conviction.

It will be interesting to see whether the Criminal Appeal Court of the High Court of Justiciary upholds the original prison term. There is always a risk for appellants like Campbell that the Criminal Appeal Court may increase his prison term.

A link to a BBC article discussing Campbell’s appeal can be found below:

Alesha MacPhail killer Aaron Campbell lodges appeal against sentence

Aaron Campbell, 16, is challenging the 27-year jail term he received for the murder of six-year-old Alesha MacPhail.

Copyright Seán J Crossan, 4 April 2019

Published by

sjcrossan1

A legal blog by the author of Introductory Scots Law: Theory & Practice (3rd Edition: 2017; Hodder Gibson) Sean J. Crossan BA (Hons), LLB (Hons), MSc, TQFE I have been teaching law in Higher and Further Education for nearly 25 years. I also worked as an employment law consultant in a Glasgow law firm for over a decade. I am also a trade union representative and continue to make full use of my legal background. Please note that this Blog provides a general commentary about issues in Scots Law. It is not intended as a substitute for in-depth legal advice. If you have a specific legal problem, you should always consult with a qualified Scottish solicitor who will be able to provide you with the support that you require.

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