Scottish Criminal Court Statistics

The first quarterly bulletin detailing criminal court activity was published the week beginning 11 March 2019 by the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Services (SCTS).

The SCTS notes that:

“There were 109,881 first instance criminal cases registered in Scottish courts in 2017/18 which is 25% less than the number of cases registered in 2014/15 and 7% less than 2016/17. Most of the reduction in cases registered is attributable to changes in summary crime rather than solemn crime.

A link to a commentary on these official statistics can be found below:

http://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/docs/default-source/aboutscs/reports-and-data/criminal-court-statistics/qcc01/scts-quarterly-criminal-court-statistics—bulletin-q1-2018-19.docx?sfvrsn=2

According to SCTS:

The statistics in this bulletin do not have information relating to accused persons in terms of what they were charged with or their resulting conviction or sentence as there are already wellestablished National Statistics on these aspects of criminal justice. This bulletin does not cover court cases relating to civil business.

See the Scottish Government’s website for statistics relating to criminal or civil justice:

http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice

The SCTS goes on to say:

This is the first bulletin in a new series of quarterly reports on criminal court activity and can be viewed within the ‘Statistics’ section of webpage“:   

http://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/about-the-scottish-court-service/reports-data.

Published by

sjcrossan1

A legal blog by the author of Introductory Scots Law: Theory & Practice (3rd Edition: 2017; Hodder Gibson) Sean J. Crossan BA (Hons), LLB (Hons), MSc, TQFE I have been teaching law in Higher and Further Education for nearly 25 years. I also worked as an employment law consultant in a Glasgow law firm for over a decade. I am also a trade union representative and continue to make full use of my legal background. Please note that this Blog provides a general commentary about issues in Scots Law. It is not intended as a substitute for in-depth legal advice. If you have a specific legal problem, you should always consult with a qualified Scottish solicitor who will be able to provide you with the support that you require.

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