Sexism in the UK

Photo by 🇨🇭 Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum on Unsplash

If you read this Blog fairly regularly, you will be aware that the issue of equality (or should that be the lack of equality?) is a common theme.

Depressingly in 2019, print and online media are full of stories which reinforce the fact that, as a society, the UK still has a long way to go in terms of gender equality. From the entrenched gender pay gap; to pregnancy and maternity discrimination; and the prevalence of incompetent male leaders, it still looks very much like a man’s world.

If you don’t believe me or think that I’m painting an overly bleak picture, please read about the latest research carried out by the Young Women’s Trust which found that 2 out of every 5 female managers believes that the place where the work suffers from sexism.

Despite the presence of legislation, such as the Equality Act 2010, women still struggle for equality in the work-place. Still don’t believe me? Just ask the female employees of City of Glasgow Council who had to fight tooth and nail to achieve equal pay earlier this year.

A link to a press release from the Young Women’s Trust can be found below:

https://www.youngwomenstrust.org/what_we_do/media_centre/press_releases/987_two_in_five_female_bosses_say_their_workplace_is_sexist

A link to an article in The Independent about the Trust’s research can be found below:

https://edition.independent.co.uk/editions/uk.co.independent.issue.200619/data/8965916/index.html

CopyrighSeán J Crossan, 20 June 2019

Published by

sjcrossan1

A legal blog by the author of Introductory Scots Law: Theory & Practice (3rd Edition: 2017; Hodder Gibson) Sean J. Crossan BA (Hons), LLB (Hons), MSc, TQFE I have been teaching law in Higher and Further Education for nearly 25 years. I also worked as an employment law consultant in a Glasgow law firm for over a decade. I am also a trade union representative and continue to make full use of my legal background. Please note that this Blog provides a general commentary about issues in Scots Law. It is not intended as a substitute for in-depth legal advice. If you have a specific legal problem, you should always consult with a qualified Scottish solicitor who will be able to provide you with the support that you require.

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